EPIC Events

Giving Tuesday 2020: Giving Back & Moving Forward

Monday, November 30th, 2020
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Giving Tuesday, the international day of charitable giving, is an international movement. Founded in New York in 2012 as a response to the commercialization and consumerism of the holiday season, the event has spread worldwide. Having a single day of concentrated giving has been important to nonprofits.

Last year, American nonprofits were given an estimated $1.9 billion on this single day—the largest single day of donations in the year. Giving Tuesday is an annual tradition, the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving, and the humble alternative to the shopping frenzy of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. On this day, you are encouraged to give to the nonprofits like EPIC that you believe are making this world a better place. 

On this all-important day of Giving, I wanted to share with you why I care so deeply about the work we do at EPIC and why I believe EPIC makes a difference.

In 2010, EPIC became alarmed because population surveys of Humboldt martens showed that the population of this cute coastal marten was in major decline. So EPIC got to work. We submitted a petition to list the species under the Endangered Species Act and pushed for more protections for the marten.

It took 10 years and multiple lawsuits but we were successful in finally getting new safeguards for the marten just this year. But more than just new protections, the listing process has resulted in significant investment in science and conservation planning for the species, which will hopefully put the species on the fast-track for recovery. 

This year’s Giving Tuesday will be more important than ever for making sure EPIC’s work continues for critters like the marten. 2020 has been tough for the local community and many of our area’s nonprofits feel the pinch as charitable giving has taken a hit along with the economy. If you have the means, consider doubling your annual donations this year to help make up for others who can’t afford to donate this year. There are also easy ways to increase your contribution. Your employer may have a matching donation program or other incentives for you to give. Facebook is also going to match donations on Giving Tuesday if you donate through the platform

Not only will your donation sustain the nonprofit institutions, but it will make you feel better than if you spent the money on yourself. Seriously, there is hard science to back this up. A 2006 peer-reviewed study utilized MRI imaging to see how our brains react to charitable giving. Giving triggers the reward center of the brain, resulting in reaction similar to other stimuli like food or sex, and a flush of dopamine and oxytocin released—the donor’s high! Giving is also contagious. A 2010 study found that giving has a multiplier effect. You are more likely to inspire others to give. And it doesn’t end there. The correlation extends to three degrees of separation—your behavior can influence a third person’s behavior that you’ve never even met! 

We all have a choice in how we spend our hard-earned money; during this season of thanks and generosity, please give to your local nonprofit organizations because you value and benefit from their mission, and because you believe in humanity’s ability to positively impact the world. As the Executive Director of EPIC, I’d be thrilled if you donated to support our work. But I’d be happy if you gave to any local organization that shared your beliefs. The point is to give—be generous, be larger than yourself. 


Are You A North Coast Co-op Member? Vote For EPIC By Nov. 19th!

Wednesday, November 11th, 2020
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EPIC is one out of twenty-seven local, nonprofit organizations that applied and qualified to be part of the Co-op’s Seeds for Change Round-up Program. There are eight openings for 2021. If you are a member of the North Coast Co-op, it’s time for you to help choose the EIGHT you most want to support and we hope EPIC will be one of them! The organizations selected by the membership will get a spot in the program and will be announced in December.

Seeds for Change is a community-giving opportunity that allows customers to ‘round up’ their Co-op purchases to the nearest dollar. We take those extra cents and give them directly to local organizations that are doing important work to better our community. A different nonprofit organization is selected to benefit from the round ups each month. 

Vote before 9:00 PM on November 19th:

Online: www.northcoast.coop/vote

In-store: Ballots available at both Co-op locations

Please vote for EPIC today!


Thank You For An EPIC Virtual Fall Celebration!

Wednesday, November 11th, 2020
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Much like the willow tree, everyone this year has had to be flexible and bend to the strange winds we have been dealt. We weren’t sure how it would go having our Annual Fall Celebration––usually a raucous yet cozy affair with live bands and a full bar–– completely virtual. Yet, we bent and improvised and reassessed. Luckily, we found that we were able to offer much of what we usually have at our Fall Celebration. We had an online auction, two options for catered meal pick-ups, and a Zoom event complete with a Sempervirens Award celebrating the incredible life of Eileen Cooper, live performances from Casey Neill and Joanne Rand, and a Q&A with Congressman Jared Huffman. While we truly missed dancing and toasting in person, we were absolutely overtaken with how fun this year’s event still was. 

Thanks to Joanne Rand for your ballads.

This would not have been possible without the help of many hands and our extraordinary community. We want to extend our extreme gratitude first to our volunteers. For getting the word out, we are so thankful to our social media guru and intern, Clary Montagne Greacen, who kept the ball rolling for our social media accounts. We are also super thankful to Jenna Catsos of Pen & Pine who created the beautiful graphic for our Fall Celebration poster (which is now a rad EPIC sticker that you can purchase!).
On the radio, special thanks to Lauren Schmitt, Tanya Horlick, and Duff on KMUD for making sure the Southern Humboldt crowd heard about the event! On the ground, we want to thank Rob DiPerna, Dian Griffith, Bente Janssen, and Tanya Horlick for making the rounds with posters. 

For our catered meals, special thanks to Chef Natalia Boyce and Edward Hunter who prepared the delicious meal for our Northern Humboldt friends with bounty from Luna Farm, Jacoby Creek Land Trust, Cypress Grove, and Little River Farm. And in Southern Humboldt, huge thanks to the Mateel Community Center and the wonderful Babette Bach and Moses Danzer from Barbeque to You for creating a tasty fall meal with support from Chautauqua Natural Foods, North Bay Shellfish, Tree Nug Farms, and Mycality Mushrooms. Volunteers who braved the frost and rain to make the catered meal pick-up possible include Ann Wallace, Lauren Schmitt, Duff, Emily Ficklin-Wood, Adam, Nicole, and the awesome Rob DiPerna. 

Thanks to Casey Neill for a great performance!

For our silent auction: Gisèle Albertine and her partner Nancy Noll, Josefina Barrantes, Nathan Madsen, Tony Silvaggio, Destiny Preston, and Judith Mayer all helped to create an incredible array of items and getaways for you all to bid on by asking businesses far and wide for their support. We are also especially grateful for the many businesses, artists, and sponsors that made this event financially possible for us and helped our fundraising efforts be a reality after a summer of no events. 

We also want to extend our thanks to our Del Norte community who came together to help make the Sempervirens Award for Eileen Cooper a beautiful tribute. Because of our roots in Southern Humboldt, we have honored many of the great activists of that area with the award. Eileen is our first recipient from Del Norte County and sadly, she passed only a week away from the Celebration. However, of course, the award pales in comparison to the legacy that Eileen has left for Del Norte County.

Before she passed, Eileen helped to establish the EPIC Del Norte Chapter. The Chapter helps to empower local activists in Del Norte County and to be a louder, prouder voice for the environment. Eileen seeded the Chapter with an endowment to keep folks working on behalf of Del Norte County. This endowment is managed by the Humboldt Area Foundation. It will ensure that work is always funded in Del Norte County, and the larger the initial capital for the endowment, the more we can do year-in and year-out in the county. If you are interested in donating to the EPIC Del Norte Fund, please click on this link. All money in the Del Norte Fund goes to EPIC work in the county.

A video of Eileen Cooper singing at a town hall was played in her memory.

Lastly, we want to thank all of our supporters and members, the main reason and possibility behind our celebration and organization. What a year! We hope you were all able to participate in some form for our annual Fall Celebration reunion of our members, supporters, and friends. If we forgot anyone in this thank you, please let us know so we can correct our error. If you have any questions or grievances overall about the event, please contact [email protected].

  

 


Trick or Treat? EPIC Goodies For Your Halloween!

Tuesday, October 27th, 2020
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This year’s Halloween not only comes on a Saturday, but also on a full moon! A perfect night for lots of silly tricks… and also lots of wonderful treats! EPIC has some great treats to share with you all in honor of our Annual Fall Celebration. Get ready for the weekend after Halloween by pre-reserving or bidding on TREATS this Halloween weekend!

Catered Dinners & Local Libations

Live in Humboldt County? Treat yourself or a loved one to an amazing meal next week by reserving a delicious farm-to-table dinner for pick-up in either Southern Humboldt OR Northern Humboldt. You can also pre-reserve bottles of local wines and six-packs of local beers. Pick-up is on November 6, 2020 at either the Bayside Community Hall or the Mateel Community Center. Check out your many options here. 

Silent Auction Deals 

Find a way to support LOCAL businesses and your local environmental non-profit by bidding on our incredible silent auction! We have so much available and you can bid from the convenience of your own home! Check it all out and be prepared to find some really wonderful getaway packages, gift baskets, gift certificates, art, and more all up for bidding on our Silent Auction Website.



Save The Date! The 43rd Annual EPIC ‘Virtual’ Fall Celebration: Bringing The Wild To You

Sunday, October 25th, 2020
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On behalf of the staff and board of EPIC, you are cordially invited to the The 43rd Annual EPIC ‘Virtual’ Fall Celebration starting at 6pm on Friday, November 6th, 2020 on Zoom. Despite not getting to see your lovely faces in person, we are certainly looking forward to this event. We will be featuring a wonderful schedule, complete with break-out happy hour groups, live music & speakers, catered meals, and a great silent auction.

We are so appreciative of all of our supporters and members and we are thrilled to be able to offer an event amidst these strange times. This is our largest fundraiser of the year and all funds go to protecting our beloved forests and the species that depend on them. Please join us this November 6th! 

Ticket Options Available: EPIC’s 2020 Fall Celebration Event Page

SEMPERVIRENS AWARD CEREMONY HONORING EILEEN COOPER

EPIC will be awarding the Sempervirens Lifetime Achievement Award to Eileen Cooper. Eileen is a fighter: for peace, for the common person, and for the environment. Through her decades-long work to save wild places and spaces, she has made her little corner of California a better place.

 

 

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES BY JOANNE RAND & CASEY NEILL

We are excited to have two longtime  EPIC favorites performing live on our Zoom event. We look forward to hearing some beautiful acoustic sets from Joanne Rand and Casey Neill. 

GUEST SPEAKER: REP. JARED HUFFMAN 

Our event will be the weekend after the big upcoming presidential election. We are sure no matter what the outcome is that Representative Jared Huffman will have a lot to say.  Find out what the next Congress has in store, details of the Green New Deal, and more! 

 

SILENT AUCTION

We will have an exceptional online array of beautiful arts, crafts, locally made products, experiences, and getaways that will make perfect gifts for your friends and family. Check out what we are offering here. Bidding starts October 19th. 

CATERED DINNER OPTIONS

We will be expecting to offer two different and delicious catered dinner options featuring local and organic ingredients for pick-up in both the Southern Humboldt area and in Northern Humboldt (reservations made in advance). More details coming soon!

DONATIONS AND SPONSORSHIPS

If you are an entrepreneur, consider sponsoring the event! A sponsorship costs $300 and includes a feature in EPIC’s 10k member newsletter, website, social media, and provides a charitable tax-deduction for your business. If you would like to donate an item for the silent auction, we will promote your items online and at the event. For inquiries into either of these options, please contact [email protected].

Stay tuned for more information 🙂 

We can’t wait to see you on the Wild Web!

Amber, Rhiannon, Tom, & Kimberly 

Buy Tickets Now!


Climate Change Anxiety Got You Down? Join Our Webinar!

Tuesday, April 28th, 2020
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Does thinking about climate change give you a sinking feeling? Does the Anthropocene keep you awake at night? Me too. Join EPIC, Friends of the Eel River, Humboldt Baykeeper, and the Northcoast Environmental Center on Tuesday, May 5 from 7-8pm for a special discussion with HSU Professor Sarah Ray, author of the new book, “A Field Guide to Climate Anxiety: How to Keep Your Cool on a Warming Planet,” to learn how to become a more resilient person and a more effective activist. Register for the online webinar today!

Caring about the environment can be emotionally difficult. An environmental education has costs, including an acute awareness of what is wrong with the world. Or, as the ever-eloquent Aldo Leopold put it, “One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds.” To many, climate change is anxiety producing—and for good reason. How we deal with this anxiety is important. Do we burn out or burn brighter?

Register for the webinar today!

 Want to pick up a copy of A Field Guide to Climate Anxiety? Help support local bookstores! Eureka Books and Northtown Books have the book in stock for curbside pickup or delivery. If you live outside the area, you can also find the book online here.

 Based on Ray’s decade-plus of experience as a college educator and program leader, A Field Guide to Climate Anxiety is not just another self-help book: it draws on research in psychology, sociology, cultural studies, mindfulness insights, social justice movements, and the environmental humanities. The result is an accessible and relatable resource for anyone struggling with climate anxiety. Chapter themes include:

— How to identify the signs and symptoms of climate anxiety, and where they come from;

— Finding your place in the climate movement;

— Parsing journalism and sensational media representations of environmental crises;

— Resisting the urge to argue and be “right”;

— Allowing yourself to have fun and experience joy despite the state of things.

Register Now!


Get Funky For The Forest At EPIC’s Forest Prom: POSTPONED

Wednesday, March 4th, 2020
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UPDATE: Due to the current circumstances surrounding COVID-19, the EPIC Forest Prom will be postponed until further notice. We look forward to celebrating with you all potentially in the fall.

EPIC’s “Forest” Prom will be held on Saturday, May 9th at the Veterans Hall in Arcata.

This redwood carpet affair will provide an experience you do not want to miss! Whether you never went to your High School Prom, desperately want a “do over”, or just want to have a good time, this event promises to create lasting memories all in support of EPIC’s efforts to protect and restore the forests of Northcoast California.

EPIC Prom is ALL ages.

Come dressed to impress and be ready to capture new prom memories in our photo booth. Don’t worry about spiking the punch- our full bar will have mixed drinks, locally crafted brew, and non-alcoholic beverages.

A live vinyl set will be provided to get you grooving with friends and funky soul jams by Object Heavy will close the night.

We will have raffle tickets available to win some incredible prizes and you can use each ticket you buy to vote for your choice of Forest Prom Eco-Crown Winner! We are accepting nominations NOW for people who shine as environmental royalty by working hard to protect the special places of this area (please choose people in this county only), and nominees will be voted on by our Board. Please e-mail [email protected] if you have someone in mind!

SCHEDULE:
8:00PM: Doors open for Cocktail Hour & Photo Booth
8:00PM: DJ Music- TBA
9:30PM: Prom Forest Crown Commencement
10:30PM: Music by Object Heavy

Tickets at the door:
Student Tickets $15
Non-Student Tickets $20

We hope to see you there!

Volunteers are needed to help with the production of this event. If you are interested in getting involved, please email [email protected] or call 707-822-7711.

Invite your friends and RSVP on our Facebook Event Page!


EPIC Music Benefit ft. Axon Orchestra on Feb. 5th, Arcata Playhouse

Tuesday, January 21st, 2020
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Axon Orchestra will be playing at the Arcata Playhouse on Wednesday, February 5th from 6:30-10:00 pm as a benefit for EPIC.

Axon Orchestra is a world music, gypsy-jazz inspired ensemble featuring Fabrice Martinez on Violin, Dusty Brough on Guitar, and Miles Jay on stand-up bass. Fabrice Martinez has played numerous benefits for EPIC in the past with local favorite  Fishtank Ensemble. He is always a pleasure to see!!  His current ensemble is also fabulous and certain to please!

Doors will open at 6:30 and a dinner with hearty soup, salad and locally-baked bread will be available along with local beer, wine, and creatively curated cocktails. Tickets will be for sale at the door for $12-$20 sliding scale with no one turned away.

Make sure to bring your dancing shoes and come support EPIC!

To learn more about the event and Axon Orchestra, check out the Facebook event page here or call the EPIC Office at 707-822-7711.

 


2019 EPIC Fall Celebration Highlights and Thank You’s

Tuesday, November 19th, 2019
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The EPIC Fall Celebration at the Mateel Community Center was a great success thanks to all of our incredible volunteers who were on the ground making the event a smooth and fun experience, our awesome attendees, and of course, the many wonderful and talented community members and businesses that donated this year. We extend our gratitude and blessings to all mentioned and especially to Dennis Cunningham for making the long trip up to accept the Sempervirens Lifetime Achievement Award.

Some highlights include a fantastic meal catered by Natalia Boyce with vegetable donations from Luna Farm and Misty Meadows Farm. Luna Farm also donated all of our seasonal table decorations of bright cayennes, decorative gourds, magnificent persimmon branches, and corn stalks.

Our Silent Auction this year was one to write home about with all of the local items and getaways donated by such a generous community. We hope you came home with something fantastic!

Dennis Cunningham gave an awe-inspiring speech and many younger people in the crowd were excited to hear about his legacy of civil rights protection. Delhi 2 Dublin had many people on the dance floor and gave a fun performance to all. We greatly appreciate all that attended and would love to see more pictures if you took some. Feel free to e-mail your pictures to [email protected] or tag us on FB or Instagram.

Dennis Cunningham accepting Sempervirens Award. Photo by Paul Mason.


Volunteers Needed: EPIC Fall Celebration

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019
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The seasons have changed, the crisp air of October has come upon us, and our Annual Fall Celebration is just around the corner. We have a growing inventory of incredible items for our silent auction from so many lovely businesses around town, a delicious locally-sourced Indian Feast growing on the vines, and a great array of local beers and wines for your imbibing pleasure. We are getting excited to celebrate and share a merry evening with you all. The Fall Celebration is our biggest annual fundraiser of the year and it is made possible by all of the great support we receive from our community!

Are you looking for a way to plug into that community and give back before the holidays while having fun? Support EPIC by volunteering for our Fall Celebration this November 9th, at the Mateel Community Center in Redway. We ask that volunteers give 3-4 hours of their time for a shift. Volunteering comes with free entry, dinner, and ample time to boogie! Don’t have a ride or need more passengers? We have set up a carpool page here where you can register your vehicle or catch a ride with someone else.

Some examples of volunteering positions available:

Set-up 12pm-3pm
Set-up 3pm-6pm
Mixed Drinks Bar Helper 6pm-9pm
Mixed Drinks Bar Helper 9pm-12am
Clean-up 11pm-1am
Check-in Table 8:45pm-11pm
Check-in Table 8:45pm-11pm
Photobooth Helper 6pm-9pm
Photobooth Helper 9pm-12am
Dessert and Coffee Shift 2 10pm-12am

If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Rhiannon at [email protected] or call (707) 822-7711. For more details about the event, check out our Event Page on our website to get tickets, or our FB Event page. Please share this with friends, colleagues, or family members who may be interested. We look forward to hearing from you!  


EPIC August Events: Covelo Blackberry Fest, Blue Lake Music Fest, and Outdoor Movie (CANCELLED)!

Monday, August 5th, 2019
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August has come into full swing and we will be tabling at some fun upcoming events in the next few weeks with options across the board from Covelo to Blue Lake to Garberville!

August 17-18th

We are excited to be in Mendocino County at the Round Valley Blackberry Festival on August 17th and 18th for the first time this year! We are looking forward to connecting with our Mendocino supporters again and getting to try some tasty, blackberry treats! We will be tabling from 10am-6pm on Saturday and 10am-5pm Sunday in downtown Covelo. Come out for the best of summer’s offerings and have a slice of blackberry pie, a sip of blackberry wine, and some music in the sun. This event is free for the public.

 

August 17th

Not making it down south for the Blackberry Fest? On the same weekend, EPIC will also be tabling at the Blue Lake Music Festival on August 17th from 11am-5pm at Perigot Park in sunny Blue Lake.The Blue Lake Music Festival is held by the Musicians for Community and Veterans For Peace Humboldt Bay Chapter 56. This event benefits the community and local economy with great music and entertainment, food and beverages, a BBQ, a beer and wine tent, local artisans, vendors and more. $10 at the door.

August 23rd- CANCELLED—This event has been cancelled by the organizers. Apologies for the late notice. 

Join us Friday night on August 23rd in Garberville Town Square for a free community outdoor movie night. We will be selling candy and merch at the showing for a family-friendly movie called “epic”, a newer animation film similar to Fern Gully, in which “a teenager finds herself transported to a deep forest setting where a battle between the forces of good and the forces of evil is taking place. She bands together with a rag-tag group characters in order to save their world — and ours.”  The movie will run from dusk until around 10:30 pm. Show up by 7pm to get your seats, talk to our staff, and eat some goodies! —-CANCELLED—-


Help Save One of California’s Rarest Plants

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019
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Save the date! There are only 20 know populations of Shasta snow-wreath on the planet. Come join EPIC April 25-26 at Packers Bay on the Shasta Reservoir to help protect this beautiful plant from being invaded by Scotch broom. EPIC volunteers will be pulling the invasive non-native Scotch Broom and helping to protect stream sides from being sprayed with toxic glysophate.

The Shasta snow-wreath (Neviusia cliftonii) is endemic to the shores and canyons around Shasta Reservoir. Neviusia have existed for over 45 million years; however it was not discovered until 1992! The Eastern Klamath Range is an ancient landscape, neither glaciated nor overlain by volcanic material, as were the surrounding mountains. The area is rich in biodiversity and is home to other endemic species such as the Shasta salamander (Hydromantes shastae) a state-listed threatened species and the Shasta Chaparral snail.

Many Shasta snow-wreath populations were lost when the reservoir was created and others are threatened by the proposal to raise the dam. Scotch brooms are another threat and have infested multiple areas near Packers Bay. Last year EPIC protected a few of the most sensitive populations from the possible drift of herbicides and we plan to do it again every year till the broom is gone from the creek side location. Working together demonstrates that people power is the best alternative.

Stay tuned for more details coming in April.


Meet the Man Who Discovered Headwaters Forest

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016
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Photo by: Mary McKernan

Photo by: Mary McKernan

Greg King is the 2016 Sempervirens Lifetime Achievement Award Winner. In addition to discovering Headwaters Forest and leading the fight to save the largest remaining patch of old-growth redwoods in private hands, Greg has worked as a journalist, activist, and environmental professional, including founding and running the Siskiyou Land Conservancy. His lifetime of work is an inspiration to us all. The following excerpt is taken from an interview with Greg from the EcoNews Report on KHSU. Greg will be receiving the Sempervirens Award at EPIC’s Fall Celebration, at the Mateel Community Center on Friday, November 4th 2016, with musical performances by Joanne Rand, Woven Roots and Object Heavy. Click here to purchase your tickets to the event.

Natalynne: You’ve devoted over 30 years to the environmental movement, what caused you to become an environmentalist? 

Greg: When I got out of college in 1985, I started to work for a newspaper called, “The Paper.” I discovered that this beautiful second-growth redwood grove on the Russian River had been flagged for logging. So that was when I got into investigating timber politics and that led me to understand logging laws and timber harvest laws. I discovered that Louisiana Pacific was regularly violating state logging laws. I learned by talking to Sharon Duggan, EPIC’s attorney, that this was how things were going in timber politics.

Then, in late-1985 Maxxam took over Pacific Lumber, and everyone knew that Pacific Lumber had the world’s largest ancient redwood groves left on earth that weren’t in parks. So again, I was talking to Sharon and I said “I think I want to look into that” and she said “Yeah you probably should, somebody needs to look into that”—the takeover had just happened.

Early on in ‘86 it was clear that that was what was happening, this dismantling of the last ancient redwood grove on earth, with the complete rubber stamp of the state, and county officials just bending over for Maxxam. It was really actually disgusting how little internal dissention there was for what was clearly illegal logging and an illegal take over [of Pacific Lumber]. So I started writing to the Department of Forestry and going to Humboldt County in early ‘86 to explore the woods. I went for my first hike into the ancient redwoods held by Maxxam’s Pacific Lumber, in what we now call “Owl Creek Grove,” which was 1,000 acres of untouched ancient redwoods. I was so taken aback by the power of this place—I had been to redwood groves all of my life, and all of them had the mark of humanity, the trails, the signs etc.—but this was wild redwood forest, and I felt the difference. Then I realized that Maxxam was going log this place, so I came out of the woods prepared to stop them. That’s where I met Darryl Cherney, and he and I then co-founded Humboldt County EarthFirst! and we began to organize demonstrations.

N: In addition to the publication, what strategies were you and Darryl using to get this information out to the public?

Greg King self portrait: practice climb 1998. ©2016 Greg King

Greg King self portrait: practice climb 1998. ©2016 Greg King

G: By the mid- late ‘86 we myself, some Humboldt State students, and others, like Molokai, Larry Evans, Nina Williams, and Danielle Felipa, and several other people began mapping the redwood groves. In early 1987 we put out a publication called, “Old Growth in Crisis,” and the centerfold was a map showing the size and location of these groves for the first time in public. That was a significant event to get this information out. There were the demonstrations; the first ones were in Arcata, San Francisco and Scotia in ‘86. We were taught how to climb trees by rock-climbing guru, Kurt Newman, so that’s what we did, tree sitting in large part. In May of 1987 we had a national day of direct action were we had activists storm Pacific Lumber and Maxxam sites in Houston, Wall Street, San Francisco, and Humboldt County. We did a lot of direct action—no equipment sabotage ever, no tree spiking ever—we only put ourselves on the line, tree sitting, sitting in front of bulldozers, rallying, [and] protesting. We did a lot of public outreach, a lot of good professional work to let people know what was at stake.

N: You were saying there was lets just say bullying by the Department of Forestry, and this political will to take out the forests. What do you think that was based on, why was the state rubber-stamping this? Did they have something to gain from allowing this to happen?

G: I think the incentive came from the network. I hate to use the term “good ol’ boy network,” it’s cliché, but they all went to the same forestry school mostly here at HSU. Basically the idea was to not disallow logging, and not to disallow maximum profits, so we continued to see that, and we understood that this was the way it had always been. Really it is extraordinary to me that this [was a] kind of criminal enterprise—and that’s really what people have to understand, that this was a criminal enterprise from the beginning from the takeover of PL, all the way through to the logging, through the liquidation of the assets, the bulking of the share holders.

Cecilia Lanman before arrest Carlotta rally 1996 ©2016 Greg King

Cecilia Lanman before arrest Carlotta rally 1996 ©2016 Greg King

Maxxam had excellent attorneys, they easily determined that we are going to be able to do what we want in the forest without any oversight or impediment of the state. I don’t think they expected EPIC though. I mean EPIC really was heroic, the efforts of EPIC at that time. Cecilia Lanman—I mean you can’t pull out just one person, so many people, including this great volunteer run board of directors that still continues today—but Cecilia just sticking with it, through difficult times, unpaid, and just not letting it go, and that made a huge difference. 

N: So bringing that up, there was a very symbiotic relationship between EPIC and Humboldt Earth first, could you describe what that relationship was like?

G: The relationship was always necessarily kept in a philosophical realm and, physical in terms of it being the same issues. But of course EPIC could not do anything with illegal activity, and we were getting arrested all the time, for good reason. The relationship between EPIC and EF! was mostly philosophical, but also physical in which we were fighting for the same thing; the last of the redwoods, and not just the last of the redwoods, the last of the salmon, the last of the steelheads, the last of the marbled murrelet’s, the last of this type of habitat. Now what we need to do is lock up these “lesser cathedrals,” a horrible name for these ancient redwoods left just outside of Headwaters Forests Preserve. These are about 1,500-2,000 acres maybe of untouched redwoods, and a large swath of connected habitat land that needs to be protected very soon.

N: There’s definitely room for organizations like EPIC, Siskiyou Land Conservancy, and North Coast Regional Land trust to work with Humboldt Redwood Company to really lock up these lands. You’re now currently executive director of the Siskiyou Land Conservancy, can you describe the Siskiyou Land Conservancy?

G: We aim to create a land trust that would take title to, and hold conservation easements on, private properties not served by other land trusts — usually meaning small parcels that hold, and connect, important riparian and terrestrial habitats. In this work we have been successful. Siskiyou Land Conservancy also is the only organization dedicated to eliminating excessive pesticide use on bottomlands that surround the vital Smith River estuary, in Del Norte County. Nobody else has uncovered this terrible crime against the people in the environment there like we have, and we’ve been doing since ’04. And now we’re starting to get somewhere with the state, and the federal government is doing an investigation as well, so things are progressing.

N: So you have been on the front lines of the environmental movement for 30 years, and we know there is a lot of burn out in this line of work. How did you manage to sustain your drive for so long, and do you have any recommendations to young activists for sustaining their fight.

G: I have ebbed and flowed a lot. But what sustains me is to just get out in it, as Ed Abbey and David Foreman both kind of recommended. You have to enjoy the wild, in order to protect the wild.

Click here to listen to Greg King’s interview on the KMUD Environment Show

Click here to listen to Greg King’s interview on the KHSU EcoNews Report


We need you to show your support for Greg King, EPIC and for the beloved forests of the North Coast. Help us fill the Mateel Community Center to meet our fundraising goals for the year, by purchasing your tickets now to join us on Friday, November 4th for EPIC’s 39th Annual Fall Celebration. Act now by clicking here or on the image below. Thanks!

 


Headwaters Forest Reserve, Home, at Last

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016
By

Headwaters Forest Reserve 20 Anniversary HikeFormer U.S. President, and patriarch of American Wilderness, Theodore Roosevelt, said, “Believe that you can do something and you are half way there.” On a recent Saturday, seventeen-and-a-half years after the Headwaters Forest Reserve was established as a part of the BLM National Conservation Lands system, I had the distinct honor of guiding a group of individuals who had fought hard to save this place from the saw. This was the very first hike ever into Headwaters for some of the 50 hikers who had spearheaded the Campaign to Save Headwaters Forest from 1986-1999.

There is so much that remains so completely unlikely and unbelievable about the Headwaters Forest Reserve, for myself, and for just about everyone else I spoke with on the hike and over that weekend. First, the fact that there is such a thing as the Headwaters Forest Reserve is still very astounding and quite unbelievable in many respects. And the fact that there is the Reserve, and that the Reserve has a community-docent program, and that I, of all people am one of them, is a story that had it been told by basecamp bonfires 20 years ago, simply no one, myself included, would have ever believed it.

I moved to Humboldt County in the spring of 1997, and almost immediately found myself embroiled in the struggle to Save Headwaters Forest; 19 years later, I was at the head of the line, opening the locked logging gate at Newburg Road in Fortuna, which had been the site of thousands of arrests over the two decades of the struggle. On this day I was there to legally take into the Reserve 50 of the people who worked to protect Headwaters many for whom it was the very first time.

Headwaters 20 Yr Anniversary Gathering RD2I was quite moved and astounded to find that this tremendous community with a fighting spirit and a heart of gold was grateful that I am among those serving as an educational docent for Headwaters in the present-day. It seemed to give many comfort in knowing that the Reserve they fought so hard to create was in good hands, and that the spirit and legacy of the Campaign to Save Headwaters Forest is being carried forward in the Reserve, and on into the future.

As Margret Mead wrote, “Never doubt that a small, dedicated group of people can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” The Headwaters Forest Reserve is a testament to the spirit of this principle manifested, and for many of us that attended this hike into the old-growth, we have finally made it all the way home, at long last.

 


Westside Community Meeting in Orleans September 11th

Monday, September 7th, 2015
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Westside from BR Lookout

This Friday, concerned community members will be meeting to discuss impacts of the Westside project on our communities. In the coming days, the Klamath National Forest plans to auction off 14 timber sales, that have been analyzed as part of the Westside post-fire logging project, a large commercial salvage logging proposal that covers over 30,000 acres of management including logging on about 10,000 acres of forests affected by the Whites, Beaver and Happy Camp fires of 2014. Areas proposed for logging are adjacent to wilderness areas, the Pacific Crest Trail, within Wild and Scenic River corridors, critical habitat for coho salmon and northern spotted owls and wildlife corridors that are important for providing linkages between the islands of protected areas. The timber sales proposed in the Westside project are all located within the blue circle on the map (below). The Klamath National Forest has not yet released the Record of Decision, which was expected this week, and has not completed formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National Marine Fisheries Service. The Klamath National Forest has not yet received a water quality permit from the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board.

EPIC Connecting Wild Places with Westside IDsmallOver the past year, our staff has read and commented on the Westside Environmental Impact Statement and attended the informational meetings put forward by the Klamath National Forest, and we have all agreed that the information and format that has been provided is less than helpful.

In order to better understand the landscape that will be affected by the proposed Westside Project, we have used the shape files for the project boundaries to illustrate aerial images from google earth. These maps more accurately depict the scale, magnitude and context of the proposed project by showing the project in relation to the watersheds that are at stake. These maps will be available at the community meeting.

The Karuk Alternative maps that were developed by the Karuk Tribe have proposed to reduce the project scope to focus on strategic ridge-top fuel breaks to protect rural communities so that fire can be reintroduced to the landscape. The Karuk Alternative is a third of the scale of the Klamath National Forest’s proposal.

Since the beginning of time, fire has shaped the landscape of the region, and it is well documented that cultural burning was used to thin the understory, and allow for healthy larger trees to thrive. prescribed fires were also used to encourage the growth of important resources such as acorns and bear grass, which is used by local tribes to make baskets. Over the last century, these mountains have endured the ecologically damaging practices of clear-cut logging, fire suppression, and plantation forestry, which shape most of the landscape we see today. If you live in or visit the Klamath-Siskiyou mountains and observe your surroundings, you have probably noticed the vicious cycle of:

1. clear-cut logging of the big old fire-resistant, shade-producing trees;

2. plantations that quickly become brush fields due to lack of funds to maintain them in an ongoing way;

3. fire suppression policy that continually increases the size and severity of fires that get away;

4. fire-fighting strategies that increase the size of the burned area; and

5. salvage sales that cost taxpayers more than the government makes on the sale, and in many cases leave huge amounts of slash on the ground, setting us up for the next fire. (And setting the fish up for a hot, sediment-choked, disease-prone environment.)

If you would like to learn about the size, scope and specifics of the Westside salvage sale and discuss potential consequences and community responses, you are cordially invited to come to this important informational meeting for Westside post-fire logging project on Friday, September 11, 2015 at 6:30 pm at the Karuk DNR-Department of Natural Resources Community Room, 39051 Highway 96. In Orleans, CA. All are welcome. Refreshments and dinner included, but bring a potluck dish to share if you can.

DIRECTIONS: Headed northeast on Highway 96, go one quarter mile past Orleans and cross the bridge over the Klamath. The parking lot is on the right hand side (Just after Red Cap Road). Cell phones and GPS Navigation systems do not work here, so you may want to map your route in advance. Allow ~2 hours of drive time from Arcata area.

RESOURCES:

Google Earth image maps with timber sale boundaries – Organized by timber sale and/or watershed.

Westside Fact Sheet and Agency Contacts for Westside Project – 1 page fact sheet for letter writing.

EPIC Guide to Groundtruthing trifold – An excellent guide for analyzing project impacts in the field.

The Westside Story – An in epic analysis of the wildlife, wild rivers, and wild places that would be affected by the Westside project.

Final Comments on Westside DEIS – EPIC, Klamath Forest Alliance and KS Wild comments on the Westside Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

The Westside Final Environmental Impact Statement – A link to all of the Klamath National Forest’s documents related to the Westside project.

Timber Sale Maps developed by the Klamath National Forest:

Whites Fire Salvage Heli Map

Walker Creek Fire Salvage Heli Map

Tyler Meadows Fire Salvage Heli Map

Tom Martin Fire Salvage Heli Map

Slinkard Fire Salvage Heli Map

Salt Creek Fire Salvage SBA Map

Middle Creek Fire Salvage Heli Map

Hamburg Fire Salvage Map

Greider Heli Fire Salvage Map

Cougar Heli Fire Salvage Map

Cold Springs Fire Salvage Map

Caroline Creek Fire Salvage Heli Map

Blue Mountain Fire Salvage Heli Map

Beaver Fire Salvage Timber Sale Map

 

FlyerWestsideMeeting


Action Alert to Ban Bobcat Trapping in California

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015
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bobcat-kitten flikrTake Action Now: Bobcats are still being trapped throughout California, and their pelts are sold in the international fur trade market. Recent spikes in demand from countries like Russia and China have increased prices for bobcat pelts, resulting in a boom in bobcat trapping throughout the State of California.

On October 11 2013, the Governor approved the Bobcat Protection Act of 2013 (AB1213), which directs the California Fish and Game Commission to increase bobcat protections, and now the Commission is considering two options for bobcat trapping restrictions: Option 1 proposes a partial closure of the state to bobcat trapping by establishing closure boundaries around protected areas; and Option 2, which EPIC supports, would implement a complete ban on commercial trapping of bobcats throughout California.

The Commission is slated to make a decision to adopt regulations at their August 5th hearing, which will be held at 8am at the River Lodge at 1800 Riverwalk Drive in Fortuna California.  EPIC will join bobcat advocates from around the state to rally for the protection of bobcats at 7:30am before the hearing.

Two days before the hearing, on Monday, August 3rd from 6-8pm, EPIC and our allies will host a teach-in and poster making session in the Arts & Crafts Room at the Arcata Community Center. 

The trapping industry  has openly opposed the state wide ban, and will likely send a spokesperson to speak at the August 5th hearing in favor of bobcat trapping. This is why it is important for bobcat allies to make a presence and show the Fish and Game Commission that the overwhelming majority of people are in favor of a statewide ban.  The law on the books allows bobcat trapping season to take place between November 24 and January 31, and anyone possessing an easy-to-obtain trappers’ license can trap as many bobcats as desired until a statewide total of 14,400 bobcats are killed for the season. The nearly unrestricted statewide cap is based on out of date population estimates from the 1970’s of 72,000 individuals. This baseline number is deeply troublesome. Over thirty years ago, in 1982, a court found that the science behind the 1970’s population estimate was too flawed to qualify as the basis for a bobcat management program. Yet, no additional surveys have been conducted since.

Bobcats are shy creatures that do not threaten public safety, and while no one knows what the current bobcat populations are, there is anecdotal evidence that trapping has greatly diminished localized bobcat populations, throwing ecosystems off kilter. In fact, the state legislature recognized that bobcats are important apex predators that play a significant role in maintaining a healthy ecosystem, reducing rodent populations and preying on populations of many animals that are considered “nuisance” animals such as raccoons, opossums and skunks. Bobcat trapping hurts more than bobcats; it hurts our forests and fragile ecosystems.

In addition to protecting bobcats for ecological reasons, there is a moral obligation to end the cruel and inhumane methods of killing bobcats. Because their pelts are worth more without bullet holes or other marks, trappers often strangle, stomp or bludgeon them to death. California should lead the nation and outlaw this cruel and harmful practice.
Click here to take action now!

P.S. The last time we attended a Fish and Game Commission hearing in Fortuna, we helped sway the Commission to protect gray wolves in California and with your help, we can do this again for the bobcats.

 


Children Are Our Future

Friday, May 8th, 2015
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photo 1Someday our children will inherit this planet, so it is imperative that we teach them well and leave them with a healthy environment that they can thrive in. Last week, EPIC joined forces with the California Conservation Corps and the Watershed Stewardship Project and presented at Creek Days in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, and the week before, my colleagues Rob and Gisele presented at the Hoopa Fish Fair. These events are incredibly rewarding, and we all agreed, that we were constantly amazed by the wisdom the children shared.

As I set up my fourth to sixth grade classroom next to the “Tall Tree” I felt dwarfed by the magnificence of the towering old growth forest that surrounded me. The plaque in front of the tree said the tree was 42 feet around, and 359 feet tall, when it was measured in 1957. When a new group would come through, the children would all run over to the tree and plead with their chaperones to have their picture taken with the giant redwood.

After they explored the tall tree, I would call the children over to learn about forest ecology, how forests help keep the rivers healthy by keeping the water clean, preventing floods and providing shade, habitat and food for salmon, and how the salmon eventually become fertilizer for the forest. Then I expressed the importance of protecting wild places, because these trees would not be here if they were not protected.

Wolf Pack 2I asked the children if they knew what advocacy was. None of them knew what it meant.  I told them it was speaking on behalf of something. “For my work at EPIC it is speaking for the forests, rivers, fish and wildlife, because they can’t speak for themselves.” “You mean like the Lorax?” One of the kids asked. “Yes, just like the Lorax” I said. Showing them the photograph of the wolf rally and all of the signs people had made to advocate for wolves, I told them the story of how the gray wolf gained protections last year:

There is a lone wolf in Oregon that strayed from its pack, and began coming in and out of California. Upon learning of this wolf in the region, several ranchers and even public officials publically stated that they would kill it on sight if they found it. So we joined with a coalition of people and groups to get protections for the wolf so that if it came to California, it would be safe. At the wolf hearing my two-year old son stood up in front of the Fish and Game Commission during the public comment session in front of a packed house with hundreds of people and shouted into the microphone “Protect wolves!” As people teared up hearing the plea of a little boy who wants to see wolves protected, the next commenter announced that the lone wolf “Journey” has just been confirmed to have puppies!” The crowd rejoiced and soon after, the Commission voted 3-1 to grant wolves protections under the Endangered Species Act. Someone chimed in and said, “See, it doesn’t matter how old you are, you can still make a difference.”

Next, I showed them the photographs of some the critters we advocate for in our region and asked them to choose one of the animals and make a poster for it. The things they came up with were so inspiring, I decided to bring them back to the office and begin sending them to decision-makers as issues come up relating to each animal.

I taught 180 students that day, and I learned from 180 students also. Now I’m hoping that the wisdom of these children will help to remind those in power of the importance of protecting wildlife and wild places for future generations.

Tall Tree - Humboldt Redwoods State Park


Arcata Film Screening Pickaxe: the Cascadian Free State Story

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015
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elliott-group-photoPickaxe: the Cascadian Free State Story will be screened at the Arcata Theatre Lounge Monday, May 4 from 7-9pm.

Pickaxe is a documentary that follows a group of activists in their direct action efforts to stop post-fire logging of an old growth forest in Warner Creek, Willamette National Forest, blockading the logging road and repelling the State Police. After the film, activist and director, Tim Ream will be Skyped in to answer questions and discuss current efforts to protect old-growth forests in the Klamath National Forest from the Westside Timber Sale – one of the largest timber sales ever proposed in U.S. History.

As a bonus, a new short film about the Westside Post-fire Logging Proposal produced by local film-maker Abianne Prince will also screened. See the trailer below.

$5 suggested donation at the door, no one turned away for lack of funds. 

Pickaxe Description
The film shows confrontations with disgruntled loggers, mass arrests and a 75 day hunger strike. Back at Warner Creek activists build teepees and remain a living blockade on the logging road through the winter and ten feet of snow. Political pressure begins to shift and the White House promises a deal but not before Federal Agents come to bust the camp and destroy the fort. The story resolves with incredible footage of a mass jail break-in and unconditional victory for the forest. This inspiring documentary is two years in the making, and crafted from footage shot by more than two dozen people involved in the struggle to save Warner Creek. Principal photography and direction are by guerilla videographer Tim Lewis, award winner at WorldFest in 1998. Codirector/producer Tim Ream was involved in the action on and off the screen. Running Time: 95 minutes.

Click here to join and share the event on Facebook.

Pickaxe poster


Earth Day Cleanup and Hoedown – April 25

Monday, April 13th, 2015
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River CleanupCome celebrate your love for the planet by giving back! River cleanups are fun and satisfying, and we need your help to make these special places more beautiful. The third annual Earth Day cleanup and Hoedown will take place on Saturday, April 25. EPIC Volunteers are needed to help clean up the lower Mad River! The cleanup will take place in the morning, and the Hoedown will be in the afternoon from 2-6pm.  Admission to the Hoedown will be free to cleanup volunteers or $5-10 sliding scale.

CLEAN-UP

EPIC will be working with Eco-Flo Rafting Company to organize a rafting cleanup on the lower Mad River. If you are interested in participating in the EPIC clean up, please meet at the Warren Creek Disc Golf Course (between Blue Lake & Arcata) at 9:00 am. Click here to help us spread the word by joining the event and inviting your friends on the Facebook event page.

Eco-Flo Rafting Company will be providing two large rafts to take people down the Mad River to collect trash. We will be meeting at the Pump Station/ disc golf course off Warren Creek Road between Blue Lake and Arcata. Space is limited, so please RSVP with [email protected] if you would like to be a part of the rafting crew. Up to 10 volunteers can fit into the boats, and others can walk the river banks, in the area in search of trash.  Rafts, paddles, life vests and trash bags will be provided for rafters. Please bring your own snacks, water, gloves, water friendly gear, a warm jacket and layers in case it gets hot. 

Directions: 101 north of Arcata to 299 exit. 1st exit, take right at stop sign (Guintoli Ln.), then left at next stop sign (West End Rd.). Go 2 miles to a left at Warren Creek Rd. Drive slowly, pass under train tressel, then up hill to 1st driveway on the left. Please meet at the parking lot at 8:45am so we can be floating by 9.

HOEDOWN

After the clean-up, volunteers will celebrate by boogying down at the Earth Day Hoedown, which will be in the afternoon from 2-6pm. Admission to the Hoedown will be FREE to cleanup volunteers!

The Hoedown will take place at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center at 220 Stamps Lane in Manila featuring music by Lyndsey Battle and the Striped Pig String Band with barn dance calling by Nigella Mahal. Beer, wine, non-alcoholic beverages and food from the Tako Faktory will be available. In addition to the music and barn dance, a silent auction, live painting by Matt Beard, and a family games and kids corner will keep everybody entertained.

Earthday Cleanup & Hoedown

 


EPIC Invites You to Hike the Headwaters Forest Reserve April 18

Monday, April 6th, 2015
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DCIM100MEDIAEPIC invites you to join us for an educational hike in the Headwaters Forest Reserve on Saturday April 18, 2015. This guided educational hike will be led by Rob DiPerna, EPIC’s California Forest and Wildlife Advocate. We will discuss the history of the struggle to protect Headwaters Forest, the mechanisms that created the Headwaters Forest Reserve, and the contemporary challenges to land management in the Elk River watershed. The hike will originate from the Headwaters Forest Reserve South Fork Elk River trailhead, at the end of Elk River road, just south of Eureka, CA at 10 a.m. on Saturday April 18th.  This hike will cover six miles, and will take approximately 2-3 hours to complete. The hike along the South Fork Elk River trail for these six miles will be easy to moderate difficulty. Please come prepared with water, food, and appropriate hiking attire. For more information, please contact EPIC at: 707-822-7711. Hope to see you there!